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111 Churches in London That You Shouldn’t Miss takes you through the doors of 111 rarely visited churches, but which, with the help of this informative guide are now on the map!  With their spires, towers, columns and capitals, vaults and arches, carvings and paintings, London churches tell us a lot about its architecture and its history. And with their beautifully carved fonts, pulpits, carvings, mosaics and  decorative objects, they show you centuries of skill and labor that went into making these buildings for which the main objectives were majesty, endurance and posterity.
Following the little black crosses on her mini A to Z, Londoner Emma Rose Barber takes you to a ultra-modern church made in the Brutalist style, to a church once so dark, and now so light, a bombed church, now hollowed out, containing the most romantic garden in London, to churches where you can sip coffee in the aisles and nave…

The Churches of India takes the reader on a fascinating journey through India to discover the history and architecture of the country’s Christian churches. With fine illustrations and an informative, easy-to-read text the book reveals the diverse architectural styles that have evolved in different regions from the very beginnings of the Common Era identified with the birth of Christ.

Churches have been built in greater numbers from the middle of the last millennium when settlers such as the Armenians and colonisers, Portuguese, French and British, brought their own branches of Christianity and religious architecture with them. Many churches were indigenized over time while others have retained their architecture in its pure form.

Joanne Taylor’s work gives the reader a deep feeling for the range of churches and their architecture, from the humble to the grand. It is also a fine history of the search by those who design or adapt buildings for a self-identity through the symbolism, explicit or implicit, expressed in built forms.

Religious buildings give India its identity as a nation of diverse people with their own cultures. It is a country with one of the world’s richest architectural traditions. Complemented by over 300 photographs, this absorbing book is the most comprehensive work on India’s churches to date.

Parisian churches are revered around the globe. Their stunning stained-glass windows and intricate Gothic architecture are accomplishments of unrivalled elegance. Churches of Paris gathers 37 of the finest in the City of Light, spanning the 12th to the 19th centuries. Each entry is embellished with beautiful color photography and behind-the-scenes historical commentary. 

Offering insight into the buildings’ construction and genesis, this book narrates how each church was shaped by war, revolution and time. With information on restoration and preservation, this is an invaluable guide for Francophiles and curious armchair travelers alike. 

Featured churches include: Basilique du Sacré-Coeur de Montmartre, Basilique Sainte-Clotilde, Basilique Cathédrale de Saint-Denis, Notre-Dame Cathedral, La Chapelle de l’Epiphanie des Missions Etrangères et la Salle des Martyrs, La Chapelle Notre-Dame de la Médaille Miraculeuse, La Chapelle Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, La Madeleine, Notre-Dame-de-Lorette, Notre-Dame-des-Blancs-Manteaux, Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, Cathedral Saint-Alexandre-Nevsky, Saint-Augustin, La Sainte-Chapelle, Sainte-Élisabeth-de-Hongrie, Sainte-Marguerite, Saint-Étienne-du-Mont, La Sainte-Trinité, Saint-Eugène-Sainte-Cécile, Saint-Eustache, Saint-François-Xavier, Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Saint-Germain l’Auxerrois, Saint-Gervais-Saint-Protais, Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas, Saint-Joseph-des-Carmes, Saint-Julien-le-Pauvre, Saint-Louis-en-l’Île, Saint-Merry, Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis, Saint-Pierre de Montmartre, Saint-Roch, Saint-Séverin, Saint-Sulpice, Saint-Thomas-d’Aquin, Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, The American Cathedral in Paris

From Viking boxes to medieval manuscripts, mummified animals to elaborate stone carvings, Christ Church Cathedral has been the repository for an astonishing array of objects over the centuries, connecting us to the cathedral’s past in a direct and tangible way. 

These treasures provide impressive evidence of the cathedral’s extensive communications network, with Europe and beyond; the skilled craftsmanship that contributed to the creation of the cathedral building and its contents; and the many people who have passed through this extraordinary place. 

This accessible book is an eye-catching introduction to the cathedral’s history, with lively commentaries on over 50 objects in Christ Church Cathedral. Generously illustrated with a wealth of items, ranging from the curious and the unexpected to the sumptuous riches of illuminated manuscripts and church plate. This is an enjoyable guide to Christ Church Cathedral, a place of worship in the center of Dublin for almost 1,000 years. 

Our significant dead and mortality moments are remembered at dark tourism sites, where complex issues of politics, history and ethics are exposed. This first-ever travel guide to dark tourism in England offers a thought-provoking compendium of difficult heritage.

We remember the dead or acts of suffering through ‘heritage that hurts’. This book explores infamous acts as well as obscure dark tourism sites lost to memory. Each site is challenged by its history and its political discourse and questions are raised as how we remember our tragic past.

Each site also has ethical issues that need to be addressed and confronted and visiting these sites are often fraught with moral dilemmas. 111 Dark Places in England That You Shouldn’t Miss will help shine light on dark tourism and inherent complex issues associated with commemorating our dead. Dark tourism is politically vulnerable and ethically laden with moral commentary. This book attempts to be authoritative yet accessible in exploring sites of pain and shame.       

The Cathedral of the Assumption of Our Lady and Saint John the Baptist in Kutná Hora – Sedlec, the convent church of the former oldest Cistercian abbey in Bohemia (est. 1142), has been recorded in the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1995.

This beautifully illustrated book tells the story of almost 900 years of history of this remarkable place, which experienced days of glory as well as dark periods of war and plague. Today, people from all over the world come to admire the cathedral, whose current appearance was fundamentally influenced by the Baroque reconstruction performed by the brilliant architect Jan Blažej Santini-Aichel (1677–1723). The nearby Church of All Saints then receives even more attention thanks to its Ossuary which is decorated with unique skeletal ornaments. It is the only ossuary in the world where human remains have been used as design elements, and yet (or perhaps because of that), it carries a powerful message of memento mori.
Whether you are interested in history, art, architecture or religion, the former Cistercian abbey of Kutná Hora – Sedlec has it all and much more. 

Walk in Jane Austen’s footsteps with this unique travel guide – the first book to explore England in relation to its most beloved Regency author. Rambling across the rolling fields of Hampshire, along the bustling streets of London and around the golden crescents of Bath, Jane Austen’s England is the perfect companion for any Janeite planning a pilgrimage. Functionally arranged by region, each chapter tracks down the most iconic scenes from both the big and little screen, as well as the key destinations where Jane lived, danced and wrote. Descriptions of each location are interspersed with biographical anecdotes and local history. Subsections focus on various stately homes that have been featured in every adaptation of every novel, from the beloved Pride and Prejudice television series (1995, Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth) to Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (2016). With a compilation of websites, seasonal opening hours and tour details, this compact book contains everything you need to immerse yourself in Austen.

“…the panorama of a self-forgotten milieu.”  — Monopol
“Toffs behaving badly: 1980s high society in photos.” — The Times

“The pictorial equivalents of Evelyn Waugh’s sentences.” — The New Yorker
“Modest though he is, Dafydd’s photographs will endure for having perfectly captured a society on the brink of decline. Unmissable listening.” — Country & Townhouse podcast

“Wonderfully ironic, every point in the picture ignites and knows how to entertain very well.” — Lovely Books

“Dafydd catches those moments of genuine exhilaration, wealth and youth.” — The Hollywood Reporter

“I wondered if the party guests I’d photographed were just re-enacting a nostalgic fantasy, an imaginary version of England that already no longer existed.” – Dafydd Jones

Throughout the 1980s, award-winning photographer Dafydd Jones was granted access to some of England’s most exclusive upper-class events. Now, the author of Oxford: The Last Hurrah presents this irreverent and intimate portrait of birthday parties and charity balls, Eton picnics and private school celebrations.

With the crack of a hunting rifle and a spray of champagne, these photos give an almost cinematic account of high-society England at its most riotous and its most vulnerable. Against the backdrop of Thatcher’s Britain, globalization, the Falklands War, rising stocks and dwindling inherited fortunes, Jones reveals the inner lives of the established elite as they party long into the night-time of their fading world.

Praise for Oxford: The Last Hurrah

‘Sublime vintage photographs…’ – Hermione Eyre, The Telegraph

‘In The Last Hurrah…we see familiar faces from British high society poised on the brink of adulthood.’ – Eve Watling, Independent

This alternative guidebook is travel writer Ellie Walker-Arnott’s personal ode to her stunning and always intriguing home country. She takes you off the beaten track to hundreds of curious and unexpected places and reveals hidden places that tell an interesting story and will make you marvel. The book covers an eclectic range of alluring themes such as seaside secrets, historic spas, modernist architecture, adrenaline adventures, chocolate-box villages, sleepovers in incredible buildings and many more.

“Seldom does a collection of art history essays leave readers yearning for a second volume…”Barbara Wisch, Renaissance Quarterly

Roman church interiors throughout the Early Modern age were endowed with rich historical and visual significance. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, in anticipation of and following the Council of Trent, and in response to the expansion of the Roman Curia, the chapel became a singular arena in which wealthy and powerful Roman families, as well as middle-class citizens, had the opportunity to demonstrate their status and role in Roman society. In most cases the chapels were conceived not as isolated spaces, but as part of a more complex system, which involved the nave and the other chapels within the church, in a dialogue among the arts and the patrons of those other spaces. This volume explores this historical and artistic phenomenon through a number of examples involving the patronage of prominent Roman families such as the Chigis, Spadas, Caetanis, Cybos and important artists and architects such as Federico Zuccari, Giacomo della Porta, Carlo Maderno, Alessandro Algardi, Pietro da Cortona, Carlo Maratta.

This history marks the tercentenary of Jacques de Gastigny’s founding bequest for La Providence, the French hospital for the Huguenot community in England. Its survival and continuing existence today bears witness to the tenacity of the community of Huguenot refugees and their descendants. Chapters on the successive phases of its history are illustrated with portraits of the Directors and Officers, and the silver, furniture, engravings, heraldry and other memorabilia associated with them. The book traces the history of this institution from the building of the original hospital in the parish of St. Luke’s, Finsbury, and the granting of the Royal Charter by George I in 1718, to the construction of a new building in Victoria Park, Hackney, in the 1860s designed by Robert Roumieu, an architect of Huguenot descent. In its present location in Rochester, Kent, La Providence provides sheltered housing for elderly people of proven Huguenot descent. For more information please visit: http://www.johnadamsonbooks.com/frenchhospital.html

A remarkable private collection formed over the last thirty years is the focus of this richly illustrated book that introduces the reader to English silver spanning a century and a half from a little before the Tudor age (1485-1603) to the threshold of the Civil War (1642-51). This was a period when England changed out of all recognition. At the beginning it was still essentially a medieval country dominated by an autocratic king and a rich and powerful Church; by the end of the period the Church had lost virtually all of its power and, with the execution of Charles I in 1649, the monarchy itself was abolished. To a degree, this changing world is mirrored in the styles represented by the silver featuring in the collection. Besides setting the silver against its social and historical background the book examines the wide range of techniques used by silversmiths at the time to shape and adorn silver objects.

Contents: Foreword by David Little; 1 English Silver before the Civil War; 2 Conspicuous Consumption: the Ceremonies of Dining; 3 ‘Plate commonly used in the howse’; 4 Silver and Godliness; 5 The Workshop and the Trade; 6 The Afterlife of Early Silver; Catalogue of items in the Little collection; Bibliography; Index; Picture credits

• Lively introduction to early English silver• Many hitherto unpublished items of silver illustrated in colorA remarkable private collection formed over the last thirty years is the focus of this richly illustrated book that introduces the reader to English silver spanning a century and a half from a little before the Tudor age (1485-1603) to the threshold of the Civil War (1642-51). This was a period when England changed out of all recognition. At the beginning it was still essentially a medieval country dominated by an autocratic king and a rich and powerful Church; by the end of the period the Church had lost virtually all of its power and, with the execution of Charles I in 1649, the monarchy itself was abolished. To a degree, this changing world is mirrored in the styles represented by the silver featuring in the collection. Besides setting the silver against its social and historical background the book examines the wide range of techniques used by silversmiths at the time to shape and adorn silver objects.Contents: Foreword by David Little; 1 English Silver before the Civil War; 2 Conspicuous Consumption: the Ceremonies of Dining; 3 ‘Plate commonly used in the howse’; 4 Silver and Godliness; 5 The Workshop and the Trade; 6 The Afterlife of Early Silver; Catalogue of items in the Little collection; Bibliography; Index; Picture credits

When the survival of the Catholic Church was threatened during the Republic and Catholic shelter churches were not allowed to be recognizable from the street, what was not allowed to be shown on the outside was compensated for on the inside. In the 17th century, the robes became gold, silver and silk expressions of silent resistance, but also of a feminist agenda of the makers. Behind closed doors, everything was literally and figuratively pulled out to propagate the Catholic faith. Worn ball gowns with colorful flowered French, English and Chinese fashion fabrics were donated to the church by rich, pious women so that beautiful and special church vestments could be made from them. So it could easily happen that a priest in a pink robe with flowers stood at the altar.

The implications of globalization include the growing necessity for people everywhere to be working in a more global way. The growing international cooperation between professionals and clients in the field of Architectural Paint Research has highlighted the necessity of agreeing on standards in the way that samples are taken, analysed and recorded. The papers in this volume illustrate the problems involved in meeting this challenge. The importance of keeping up with present-day standards in the paint industry is also addressed. Contents: Introduction; A Walk around the Saharan Heritage: Searching for Architectural Paint Research Dr Amer Rghei; Baseline Proficiencies for Architectural Paint Research: Replacing the Goldilocks Standard Helen Hughes; Promoting Architectural Paint Research in Sweden through accessibility of samples and results Kathrin Hinrichs Degerblad; Establishing Standards for Architectural Paint Research at Historic New England Benjamin Haavik; It’s Open to Interpretation: A Study in Writing Paint Research Reports for the Entire Project Team Jennifer Cappeto; Tracing the making of the painted stone portal of Ryning palace, Stockholm Anna Henningsson and Alexandru Babos; Identification of zinc-based paints in cross-section: a comparative study of autofluorescent behavior, TSQ fluorochrome stain and elemental composition with SEM-EDS Kirsten Travers and Catherine Matsen; The use of fire retardant surface treatment in and on historic buildings Barbro Wedvik; Exterior colour schemes of dwellings in the historic centre of Visby 1860 1930: architectural paint research and the preservation of townscape Max Laserna; Architectural Paint Research – How to improve the interaction between client, commissioner and executor Jon Brænne; Facilitating awareness of a shared challenge Bernice Crijns; Architectural Paint Research: Exploring the architectural qualities of colour Angelique Friedrichs; Gunnebo House: Historic interiors research for conservation of architectural paint through an international, interdisciplinary collaboration following proposed APR standards Stephan Günther and Maria Höijer; Architectural Paint Research in the ceiling of the Gallery of Charles XI – what we learned – Kristin Fyrand; Twelve Years in Topeka: Struggles and Successes in a Phased Restoration Bryon Roesselet; How communication of research findings resulted in reconstruction of Chipolin painted surfaces at the Hermitage Castle in Denmark Line Bregnhøi; Old National Archives Johan Rittsel and Ewa Björdell; Addressing the Challenges of Modern Paint Materials: Paint Colour Quality Craig Oleszewski; Collaborating to Reveal, Interpret and Restore 1860s Decoration in Richard Upjohn’s Grace Church (Brooklyn, New York) Amanda Stauffer Park; From Pauper to Prince: Re-interpreting St. John’s Colonial Building through Decorative Finishes Stephanie M. Hoagland; Changing minds through sharing research: the preservation of historic Damascene ‘ajami rooms Anke Scharrahs; Danish church interiors, research into colour change, and knowledge of colour history used as tools in the decision-making process toward preserving church cultural heritage Karin V. Kristiansen; Tartu Art College’s role in Historic Interior Research in Estonia – Heli Tuksam; The Van Doesburg Rinsema project in Drachten and Amsterdam. An unorthodox consonant Mariël Polman, Danielle van Kempen, Arie Wallart and Luc Megens; The way forward.

Hewlett Johnson, the Red Dean of Canterbury Cathedral from 1931 to 1963, was one of the most complex and intriguing public figures in 20th-century Britain. Converted to communism in the 1890s, he spent more than half a century as a priest in the Church of England. At the heart of Johnson’s Christian faith was his unshakeable conviction that the principles of communism were all but indistinguishable from Jesus’s teaching about the Kingdom of God on earth. For those who heard his sermons on Christianity and politics, Hewlett Johnson was either adored as a Christian visionary or hated as a mouthpiece of Soviet propaganda. There was little middle ground. Despised by the senior ranks of the Church of England, Hewlett Johnson was welcomed in high political places throughout the world. He had audiences with Stalin, Khrushchev, Molotov and Malenkov, Mao Tse-Tung and Chou En-Lai, Castro and Che Guevara. He also talked with Truman in the White House. He was tracked by MI5 for 35 years, was awarded the Soviet equivalent of the Nobel Peace Prize, twice spoke to huge audiences in Madison Square Garden, and was condemned by an Archbishop of Canterbury as blind, unreasonable and stupid. He was a prolific writer and a gifted orator, had two long marriages each of nearly 30 years, and became a father for the first time at the age of 66. This biography, which draws on his unpublished personal letters and papers, neither lauds nor condemns him, but re-examines his extraordinary life and career on the 80th anniversary of his appointment as Dean of Canterbury.

In the space of a few short years, English and Welsh sparkling wines have become recognized as some of the best in the world. Improvements in viniculture, a changing climate and terroir that often mimics the conditions found in the Champagne region of France have combined with the care and attention of predominantly artisanal makers to make fantastic wine. Traveling around more than 50 vineyards, Sparkling Wine celebrates this revolution. The expert author provides tasting notes, visiting information, and details on the terroir for each vineyard, along with engaging insight into the makers and their craft. This book provides an effervescent accompaniment to any country holiday. It collates directions, maps and opening times, making for an informative and accessible guide. You are rarely as far from a vineyard as you might think, and with Sparkling Wine in your pocket, with its pictures of rambling hills and grape-laden vines, Britain’s vineyards seem even closer still.

Margaret Mercer Elphinstone (1788-1867), with her powerful mind and independent spirit, was never daunted by adversity as she sought to realize her ambitions for her family against the background of intellectual upheaval and social and political change which followed the French Revolution and the end of the ancien régime. The turning-point in her life was her controversial marriage in 1817 with the general Charles de Flahaut (1785-1870), which, contrary to all expectations, resulted in one of the most successful partnerships in the ‘auld alliance’ between France and Scotland.

Whereas the life of her husband, the dashing Napoleonic general and diplomat Charles de Flahaut, is well known, Margaret has remained in the shadows. Yet this biographical study, based on unpublished correspondence in the Archives Nationales, Paris, reveals her to have been the more interesting of the two. It shows how much he depended on her brains, political judgment and artistic taste as well as her fortune to guide him in his career. Her lively, observant but wicked pen takes us with her on visits to Talleyrand, to the marquis de Lafayette, to the duchesse de Praslin, to house parties in stately homes of England and Scotland. Acknowledged a superb hostess, her descriptions of the menus, and entertainments organized in her homes in Scotland, London and Paris, and at the Flahaut embassies in Vienna and in London capture the flavor of those cosmopolitan gatherings. A lifelong liberal in politics and an upholder of Whig principles, her politicomanie inspires sharp comments on the opponents of Reform in England and on the self-seeking ministers of Louis-Philippe in France.

• Features eight miniatures painted by Margaret de Flahaut• Draws on unpublished and intimate correspondence from the Archives Nationales, Paris, and elsewhereMargaret Mercer Elphinstone (1788-1867), with her powerful mind and independent spirit, was never daunted by adversity as she sought to realize her ambitions for her family against the background of intellectual upheaval and social and political change which followed the French Revolution and the end of the ancien régime. The turning-point in her life was her controversial marriage in 1817 with the general Charles de Flahaut (1785-1870), which, contrary to all expectations, resulted in one of the most successful partnerships in the ‘auld alliance’ between France and Scotland.

Whereas the life of her husband, the dashing Napoleonic general and diplomat Charles de Flahaut, is well known, Margaret has remained in the shadows. Yet this biographical study, based on unpublished correspondence in the Archives Nationales, Paris, reveals her to have been the more interesting of the two. It shows how much he depended on her brains, political judgment and artistic taste as well as her fortune to guide him in his career. Her lively, observant but wicked pen takes us with her on visits to Talleyrand, to the marquis de Lafayette, to the duchesse de Praslin, to house parties in stately homes of England and Scotland. Acknowledged a superb hostess, her descriptions of the menus, and entertainments organized in her homes in Scotland, London and Paris, and at the Flahaut embassies in Vienna and in London capture the flavor of those cosmopolitan gatherings. A lifelong liberal in politics and an upholder of Whig principles, her politicomanie inspires sharp comments on the opponents of Reform in England and on the self-seeking ministers of Louis-Philippe in France.

The work of Polhemus Savery DaSilva (PSD) synthesizes ideas from modernism, Shingle Style, and New England vernacular architecture into special homes that are carefully crafted for each different site and client. PSD’s poetic architecture reflects on the joy of living by the New England coast, and this major new monograph, The Art of Creating Houses: Polhemus Savery DaSilva, beautifully presents that work and the ideas embodied within it. This lavishly illustrated and clearly written coverage of PSD’s most recent work features 27 select homes designed and built by the firm. This stunning volume also contains a foreword by Brian Vanden Brink; an introduction by Victor Deupi, PhD; and text by John R. DaSilva, FAIA, the firm’s Design Principal. This new volume is a brilliant companion to the firm’s earlier monographs, namely Living Where Land Meets the Sea, Shingled Houses in the Summer Sun, and Architecture of the Cape Cod Summer.

The art of East Anglia was pre-eminent during the late thirteenth and the first half of the fourteenth century. Wooden screens with painted panels were one of the most essential fittings of late pre-Reformation churches, serving both to protect the high altar and to define the division between the chancel and the nave and aisles. Whereas very few screens dating from the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries survive, the surviving fifteenth-century rood-screen paintings in East Anglia form the largest body of late mediaeval painting to be found in England. Details of more than a thousand panels from more than one hundred screens are listed, described and in many cases illustrated in this volume accompanied by commentaries on their design, techniques and materials used in their making and how they were paid for. Contents:
Chapter I Surviving rood-screen paintings; Part I: Early screens Part II: The Ranworth Group Part III: Paintings connected with Ranworth Part IV: Cawston Part V: Paintings on parchment or paper Part VI: Foreign influences and landscape backgrounds.
Chapter II The iconography of rood-screen paintings; Part I: The popularity of the saints in the late Middle Ages; Part II: The godhead, the Virgin and the Life of Christ Part III: Figures which form part of a series Part IV: Individual saints.
Chapter III The making and decoration of rood-screens; Part I: Bequests and contracts Part II: Timber and construction by Joe Dawes Part III: Painting techniques and materials expanded and updated by Pauline Plummer Part IV: Past destructive treatments and conservation.
Appendix I Gazetteer of churches.
Appendix II Donors of screens where paintings have survived.
Appendix III List of saints (including prophets and kings), their emblems, where they are to be seen and the causes for which they are invoked.

A forum (the papers of which are published here) was held in Oslo in 2010 to gather ideas, seek advice and, in general, begin to shape the onward decision-making process for a new project known as After the Black Death: Painting and Polychrome Sculpture in Norway, 1350-1550. The forum was the first step towards gaining intellectual access to altarpieces, shrines, sculptures and crucifixes for which little (if any) historical documentary evidence has survived. Significantly, too, the forum was a step toward addressing issues related to visibility. While the frontals and sculpture that pre-date 1350 are, with few exceptions, the products of Norwegian, probably monastic workshops, the majority of objects that post-date the Black Death have no such claim to a unifying cultural tradition. By contrast, the majority are categorized as the products of North German and Netherlandish workshops that were imported to Norway prior to the Reformation. Contents: Foreword; Introduction: The medieval collection of the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo: a tradition of scholarship – Erla Hohler and Noëlle L.W. Streeton Part I. Locating the Sacred: The longue durée of Romanesque altar decorations: frontals, canopies, and altar sculptures– Justin Kroesen; The presence of the sacred: relics in medieval wooden statues of Scandinavia – Lena Liepe; A perspective on medieval perception of Norwegian church art – Kaja Kollandsrud; Distribution of reliquaries and relics in the bishopric of Hólar, c. 1320 – Jón Viðar Sigurðsson Part II. Artistic production in the thirteenth century The Sedes Sapientiae of the van den Peereboom donation to the Royal Museum of Art and History in Brussels. Materials and techniques of a polychrome sculpture from the beginning of the thirteenth century – Emmanuelle Mercier and Jana Sanyova; Possible English influence on Danish polychrome wooden sculpture of the thirteenth century – Ebbe Nyborg Part III. Objects and the English church The tester over the tomb of Richard II and Anne of Bohemia, Westminster Abbey – Abigail Granville; Investigating medieval polychromy of West Country rood screens – Eddie Sinclair; Reflections and translations – carving and painting rood screens – Spike Bucklow Part IV. Material histories for late medieval and early modern painting ? conservation and the history of art The so-called Leka group: new information based on examinations of four triptychs – Tone M. Olstad; The altarpiece from Vardø church, Finnmark:: technological and art historical context – Daniela Pawel; Bernard van Orley’s The Marriage of the Virgin and Christ Among the Doctors: technical examination and the search for context – Carol Christiansen and John Hand

Aidan Dodson’s British Royal Tombs covers all the burials of the kings, queens (and lords protector) of England, Scotland and the United Kingdom, from the occupant of the great Sutton Hoo ship burial, to George VI, last Emperor of India, including of course the long-lost Richard III. This fully revised edition of a book that became an immediate classic of its kind will be equally interesting to the interested visitor and the student. The career of each ruler is briefly described, followed by what is known about his or her burial arrangements and the subsequent history of the tomb and its contents. Each tomb is illustrated as far as possible by at least one photograph or drawing. The posthumous fate of royal spouses is also included, together with information on each of the cathedrals, churches, chapels and other structures that house or once housed royal tombs; there are detailed diagrams for the major sites. A list of monarchs, family trees and an extensive bibliography complete the book.

With a penchant for painting and an appreciation for the well-designed home since he was a child, Gary McBournie has perfected the art of creating interior spaces with an impeccable eye for color. He established his design firm in Boston in 1993 and has since created warm, elegant, and timeless classic American homes, always with a twist on tradition. Finely attuned to his environment, McBournie develops each interior with a color palette that matches its surrounding exterior, splashing cool and restful hues for a cottage in New England, shades of lime and papaya in the tropics, and warm sunset tones for a ski house in Montana. Featuring personal photographs and the inspirations behind his color choices, Living Color is a must-have for anyone looking to be tickled pink by gorgeous, twenty-first-century renditions of the comfortably chic American home. Contents: Introduction; Cityscape; Rich Reds and Browns for a New York Loft Spring: Cool and Restful Hues for a Cottage; A Soft and Romantic Palette in Palm Beach; Accents of Yellow and Orange for a Range of Blues; Butter-Yellow Walls, Pale Colors, and Jewel-Toned Trims Summer: Yellows, Reds, and Pinks for a Southern Locale; Bougainvillea, Lime, and Papaya for the Tropics; Crisp Blues, Sharp Whites, and Stripes; Classic Blue and White for a Sailor’s Retreat; Saturated Colors and Vibrant Prints Autumn: A Dramatic Pied-a-Terre in Orange and Brown; Fall Colors for a Well-Patinated Patchwork; Deep Tones of Silks, Mohairs, and Cashmeres; Winter: Subtle Oranges and Reds of a Sunset Sky; Grandeur Defined by a Soft Palette and Floral Chintz; Pale, Leafy Greens and Earthy Browns for a City Loft
·Featuring stunning photographs of the unique, colorful, and inspired interiors of Gary McBournie
·Discover the never-before-seen inspirations behind McBournie’s designs

With a penchant for painting and an appreciation for the well-designed home since he was a child, Gary McBournie has perfected the art of creating interior spaces with an impeccable eye for color. He established his design firm in Boston in 1993 and has since created warm, elegant, and timeless classic American homes, always with a twist on tradition. Finely attuned to his environment, McBournie develops each interior with a color palette that matches its surrounding exterior, splashing cool and restful hues for a cottage in New England, shades of lime and papaya in the tropics, and warm sunset tones for a ski house in Montana. Featuring personal photographs and the inspirations behind his color choices, Living Color is a must-have for anyone looking to be tickled pink by gorgeous, twenty-first-century renditions of the comfortably chic American home.

Contents:
Introduction; Cityscape; Rich Reds and Browns for a New York Loft
Spring: Cool and Restful Hues for a Cottage; A Soft and Romantic Palette in Palm Beach; Accents of Yellow and Orange for a Range of Blues; Butter-Yellow Walls, Pale Colors, and Jewel-Toned Trims
Summer: Yellows, Reds, and Pinks for a Southern Locale; Bougainvillea, Lime, and Papaya for the Tropics; Crisp Blues, Sharp Whites, and Stripes; Classic Blue and White for a Sailor’s Retreat; Saturated Colors and Vibrant Prints
Autumn: A Dramatic Pied-a-Terre in Orange and Brown; Fall Colors for a Well-Patinated Patchwork; Deep Tones of Silks, Mohairs, and Cashmeres;
Winter: Subtle Oranges and Reds of a Sunset Sky; Grandeur Defined by a Soft Palette and Floral Chintz; Pale, Leafy Greens and Earthy Browns for a City Loft

This highly anticipated monograph focuses on the architectural output of Enrique Browne, a talented and prolific Chilean architect and co-founder of Browne & Swett Arquitectos, based in Santiago. Over the last 40 years, this South American architect has been trying to reconcile natural and artificial worlds through architecture. They are one indissoluble unity. This book showcases in rich photographic detail how his innovative projects incorporate multiple environmental aspects that result in a complex, layered response to the challenges of place, form and identity in Chile.

Browne’s practice has developed architectural designs in a diverse range of scales, with emphasis on sustainability and energy efficiency. This volume delves into Browne’s processes, such as developing variations of the “grapevinestructure typology” to create a “double green skin” as a green wall (or roof), to protect dwellings from the region’s strong westerly sun; or combining vegetation and its oxygenation benefits with building to counter pollution; or using both artificial and natural light as a material for illuminating spaces or volume. This book also includes commentary on the new zeitgeist surrounding modernity and the impacts of the digital and globalized world on architecture today. Highly regarded, and a prolific writer and designer, Enrique Browne has a unique way of looking at the world. Showcasing the wide range of his design, this title is sure to impress.

Peter Siemssen, a creative businessman, is the driving force behind this entirely personal publication – a book inspired by his profound knowledge of the subject as well as his passion. Siemssen presents a selection of works from his important ceramic collection against a backdrop of decades of experience and encounters with the most important contemporary ceramicists. Arranged geographically, the book presents Japanese, German, Scandinavian, Western European, North American and Mediterranean ceramics in a broad range of significant works. The high point is the work of Gilbert Portanier, with whom Peter Siemssen has had particularly close artistic contacts and ties of friendship. Documentary photographs faithfully reproducing the works lead into interpretative texts, artist biographies and Peter Siemssen’s entertaining reminiscences to provide access to art ceramics in the latter half of the 20th century. Distinguished specialists in the field contribute essays on various aspects of the subject.
A selection of the artists include; Gilbert Portanier (France), Karin Bablok (Germany), Hans-Theo Baumann (Germany), Antje Brüggemann-Breckwoldt (Germany), Nino Caruso (Italy), Antoni Cumella (Spain), Elisabeth Fritsch (England), Dorothy Hafner (USA), Shoji Hamada (Japan), Bernhard Leach (England), Stig Lindberg (Sweden), Sonngard Marcks (Germany), Renée Reichenbach (Germany), Lucie Rie (England), Ursula and Karl Scheid (Germany), Tatsuzo Shimaoka (Japan), and Björn Wiinblad (Denmark).