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Margaret Mercer Elphinstone (1788-1867), with her powerful mind and independent spirit, was never daunted by adversity as she sought to realize her ambitions for her family against the background of intellectual upheaval and social and political change which followed the French Revolution and the end of the ancien régime. The turning-point in her life was her controversial marriage in 1817 with the general Charles de Flahaut (1785-1870), which, contrary to all expectations, resulted in one of the most successful partnerships in the ‘auld alliance’ between France and Scotland.

Whereas the life of her husband, the dashing Napoleonic general and diplomat Charles de Flahaut, is well known, Margaret has remained in the shadows. Yet this biographical study, based on unpublished correspondence in the Archives Nationales, Paris, reveals her to have been the more interesting of the two. It shows how much he depended on her brains, political judgment and artistic taste as well as her fortune to guide him in his career. Her lively, observant but wicked pen takes us with her on visits to Talleyrand, to the marquis de Lafayette, to the duchesse de Praslin, to house parties in stately homes of England and Scotland. Acknowledged a superb hostess, her descriptions of the menus, and entertainments organized in her homes in Scotland, London and Paris, and at the Flahaut embassies in Vienna and in London capture the flavor of those cosmopolitan gatherings. A lifelong liberal in politics and an upholder of Whig principles, her politicomanie inspires sharp comments on the opponents of Reform in England and on the self-seeking ministers of Louis-Philippe in France.

• Features eight miniatures painted by Margaret de Flahaut• Draws on unpublished and intimate correspondence from the Archives Nationales, Paris, and elsewhereMargaret Mercer Elphinstone (1788-1867), with her powerful mind and independent spirit, was never daunted by adversity as she sought to realize her ambitions for her family against the background of intellectual upheaval and social and political change which followed the French Revolution and the end of the ancien régime. The turning-point in her life was her controversial marriage in 1817 with the general Charles de Flahaut (1785-1870), which, contrary to all expectations, resulted in one of the most successful partnerships in the ‘auld alliance’ between France and Scotland.

Whereas the life of her husband, the dashing Napoleonic general and diplomat Charles de Flahaut, is well known, Margaret has remained in the shadows. Yet this biographical study, based on unpublished correspondence in the Archives Nationales, Paris, reveals her to have been the more interesting of the two. It shows how much he depended on her brains, political judgment and artistic taste as well as her fortune to guide him in his career. Her lively, observant but wicked pen takes us with her on visits to Talleyrand, to the marquis de Lafayette, to the duchesse de Praslin, to house parties in stately homes of England and Scotland. Acknowledged a superb hostess, her descriptions of the menus, and entertainments organized in her homes in Scotland, London and Paris, and at the Flahaut embassies in Vienna and in London capture the flavor of those cosmopolitan gatherings. A lifelong liberal in politics and an upholder of Whig principles, her politicomanie inspires sharp comments on the opponents of Reform in England and on the self-seeking ministers of Louis-Philippe in France.

The work of Polhemus Savery DaSilva (PSD) synthesizes ideas from modernism, Shingle Style, and New England vernacular architecture into special homes that are carefully crafted for each different site and client. PSD’s poetic architecture reflects on the joy of living by the New England coast, and this major new monograph, The Art of Creating Houses: Polhemus Savery DaSilva, beautifully presents that work and the ideas embodied within it. This lavishly illustrated and clearly written coverage of PSD’s most recent work features 27 select homes designed and built by the firm. This stunning volume also contains a foreword by Brian Vanden Brink; an introduction by Victor Deupi, PhD; and text by John R. DaSilva, FAIA, the firm’s Design Principal. This new volume is a brilliant companion to the firm’s earlier monographs, namely Living Where Land Meets the Sea, Shingled Houses in the Summer Sun, and Architecture of the Cape Cod Summer.

Wedding floristry has always been one of the most important fields of interest for florists all over the world. Time and again floral designers manage to redefine wedding bouquets, churches and table decorations. Florever Wherever presents around 15 complete wedding stories from 15 different countries. All weddings are decorated by world famous, top-class florists, all of them being spokespersons for the floral wedding traditions of their country. This magnificent publication will show every aspect of this unforgettable day: the bridal bouquet, corsages, bridesmaids, car decoration, church/venue decoration, table arrangements and the wedding party. A book that will have you lost in sweet reveries, a romantic feast for the eyes or a source of inspiration and a fountain of ideas for couples dreaming of chiming wedding bells. Featured Florists:
Moniek Vanden Berghe (BE), Daniel Santamaría I Pueyo (ES), Markus Donati (D), Jouni Seppänen (FIN), Robert Koene (GR), Kristin Voreland (N), Damien Koh (SGP), Giordano Simonelli (I), Mark Pampling (AU) and David Beahm (US).

Ethiopia is an amazing and mysterious country. People are moved by its rich nature, culture and history, which are linked both with the Western and Islamic worlds. Ethiopia is the home of coffee and khat, the place where the oldest human being in the world was found. It harbors the source of the Blue Nile in the west and numerous treasures of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. Rock hewn churches and their relics lie hidden in the majestic mountainous landscapes of the north. In the east, people and landscapes blend into different customs, scents and colors, almost unnoticeably. In this warm fertile lowland, the impressive Harar is found: the city of a hundred mosques. Further south, there is a land of promise with lush meadows, glittering lakes and natural parks. This is the region of many colorful peoples with their centuries-old values and customs. In this country of rich traditions much is changing. In Ethiopia, modernization has begun, not only in terms of construction, technology and education, but also in the minds of its inhabitants. With its diversity of peoples, landscapes, cultures and traditions, this creates a stimulating force. Ethiopians are proud, friendly and religious. Regardless of whether they are Christian or Muslim, or worship ancient nature gods, religion provides most Ethiopians harmony, a foothold and hope. Ethiopia: Footsteps in Dust and Gold ia an amazing journey through an incredible landscape, beautifully illustrated with evocative text and illuminating photographs that capture fully its colorful diversity.

This is the first book on Venetian mosaics of the nineteenth century. It illustrates work by both the Salviati Company and the Venice and Murano Glass and Mosaic Company. A carefully researched work, Venetian Glass Mosaics addresses the revival of the art of Venetian mosaic making in the mid-nineteenth century and discusses the complicity of both Antonio Salviati and Sir Austen Henry Layard in that revival. It is a comprehensive work, illustrating Salviati’s earliest surviving mosaics, the 1860 mosaic decoration of the Royal Mausoleum at Frogmore and continuing through his company’s last commission, the Stanford Memorial Church in Palo Alto, California. The recovered art of Venetian mosaic in the late-nineteenth- and early twentieth-century is now seen as one of the most important aesthetic achievements of the Victorian-Edwardian era. Neglected and unappreciated for decades, surviving mosaics are being cleaned and restored worldwide. Whether highly visible monuments in major cities or small achievements of Venetian manufacturers are now treasured for the splendid masterpieces they are.

The papers in this volume discuss the situation of artists during the early age of industrialization in several European countries, the benefits and challenges that the new materials brought to artistic practice and their effect on the ways in which techniques were taught in the art academies. For innovative artists the new materials were significant, but others were sceptical of the new industrial products and there was a struggle towards the standardization and documentation of working processes, paints and even aesthetic concepts.

Contents: Foreword; Acknowledgements; Feeling the techniques of the past: establishing a link between later 19th-century French painting techniques and their historical European predecessors – Isabelle Nové; The golden age of the living painter 1860-1914 – How debt, default and London’s declining art market affected painters in the second half of the 19th century – Sally Woodcock; Shilling vade-mecums: watercolour painting manuals and the advancement of watercolour 1850-1880 – Fiona Mann ; Italian artists self-taught compensation strategies for their lack of technical training: a study on Gino Severini – Margherita d Ayala Valva; The disparity between sources and practice in mid-19th century English church wall painting – Elisabeth Woolley; The use of pigments in 19th-century oil paintings in Portugal: a comparative study of documentary sources and artists’ practice – Ângela Ferraz, Marta Félix Campos, Diego Sanches and Leslie Carlyle; Die Farben fließen, die Linien ragen empor, im Schatten glühen die Früchte: the working processes of Arnold Böcklin and Hans von Marées – Wibke Neugebauer; Diego Rivera’s revival of encaustic painting: the use of wax in Mexican avant-garde painting – Sandra Zetina; An introduction to a questionnaire concerning painting technique from the Silesian Museum of Fine Arts in Wroclaw, 1899-1938 – Silke Beisiegel; Evaluation of selected written sources on the painting techniques of Heinrich Campendonk and Heinrich Nauen – Stefanie Meyer and Jenny Annika Nieberle; Between chance and choice: Max Ernst’s frottages and grattages on canvas from the Menil Collection, Houston – Ellen Hansbach Bernal and Anikó Bezúr; Poisonous and unstable: iodine-based pigments in the source literature and beyond – Jilleen Nadolny; Metallic paints and modernism: artists writings and documentary sources – Maria Kokkori, Ken Sutherland and Francesco Casadio; Presenting the technical development of painting at the Deutsches Museum, Munich – Kathrin Kinseher; The chemist Wilhelm Ostwald (1853-1932) and his wide network of contemporary art technologists – Albrecht Pohlmann; Die Wiedergeburt der Farbe: Bruno Taut’s understanding of color – Stephanie Dietz; How to secure the quality of artists paints? Towards the regulation of artists paints in Germany – Andreas Burmester; Shorter papers from poster presentations; Between art and science: painting technique workshops by Kurt Wehlte – Monika Kammer; Harriet Backer: the artist’s paint tubes in Uvdal stave church and her corresponding paintings – Hartmut Kutzke and Tine Frøysaker; Fritz Gerhardt’s casein paint: a material for mural and easel painting around 1900 – Eva Reinkowski-Häfner.

Afro Libio Basaldella (Udine, 1912-Zurich, 1976) was perhaps the most renowned member of the Friuli Avant-garde Movement, which influenced his approach towards a more Expressionist sense of painting that had always been based on traditional Venetian Colorism. In the 1940s, Afro joined the Fronte Nuovo delle Arti, and following a visit to the United States, he joined the Gruppo degli Otto, with whom he exhibited at the Venice Biennale in 1952. Although in certain aspects his style seemed similar to American Action Painting, his harmonious tonal modulation and later research into abstract shapes and forms produced intellectually sophisticated results. This is the catalog of the first French retrospective of the artist, held at the Tornabuoni Art Gallery in Paris, showing works ranging from the 1930s to the 1970.

Contents:
Preface by Philip Rylands;
Afro, his work by Philip Rylands;
Afro and the New York art scene by Barbara Drudi;
Letters and writings selected by Barbara Drudi;
Critical anthology selected by Philip Rylands;
The exposition of 1949 at the MoMA by Davide Colombo;
The Garden of Hope by Anne Monfort.

This volume is a comprehensive monograph chronicling the personal and professional journey of the Indian architect and urban conservationist Brinda Somaya, from 1975 to the present. Belonging to the ‘Bridge Generation’, her work transcends stylistic vocabulary and draws its inspiration from Indian culture, the landscape of the subcontinent and principles of sustainable design and intervention.

The book explores a cross-section of Somaya’s diverse typology of projects, including housing, institutions, conservation, urban design, social design and industrial works that represent a unique ‘non-stylistic’ grammar that has a sense of ‘order and appropriateness’. Situating her work in a broader context, the essays in this volume offer multiple perspectives on Somaya’s accomplishments, while the dialogues outline the concerns central to her work.

Contents:
Foreword – James Stewart Polshek; Preface – Ruturaj Parikh; Acknowledgements; Introduction – Nandini Somaya Sampat; On India – Arun Shourie and Brinda Somaya; Bhadli village and Vasant Vidyalaya; Campus for Zensar Technologies; The Cathedral & John Connon School; Tata Consultancy Services Headquarters; Working from Mumbai – Kamu Iyer, Mary N. Woods and Brinda Somaya; The Street; The Community; Jubilee Church; Rajabai Clock Tower; Architecture and Culture – Saryu Doshi and Brinda Somaya; St Thomas Cathedral; Nalanda International School; Houses; Club Mahindra Kumbhalgarh; Campus for Goa Institute of Management; The Significance of Brinda Somaya’s Work in Post-Independence India – Jon Lang; Humility and Fierce Resolve: The Making of a Compleat Architect – Porus Olpadwala; The Empathetic Architect – Mary N. Woods; Brinda Somaya’s Practice and Contemporary Architecture in India – Ruturaj Parikh; Epilogue – Tod Williams and Billie Tsien.

• First such monograph on Brinda Somaya’s work

• Enhanced with 640 images

• Features essays by and conversations with several noted scholars

• Features many previously unseen photographs

This volume is a comprehensive monograph chronicling the personal and professional journey of the Indian architect and urban conservationist Brinda Somaya, from 1975 to the present. Belonging to the ‘Bridge Generation’, her work transcends stylistic vocabulary and draws its inspiration from Indian culture, the landscape of the subcontinent and principles of sustainable design and intervention.

The book explores a cross-section of Somaya’s diverse typology of projects, including housing, institutions, conservation, urban design, social design and industrial works that represent a unique ‘non-stylistic’ grammar that has a sense of ‘order and appropriateness’. Situating her work in a broader context, the essays in this volume offer multiple perspectives on Somaya’s accomplishments, while the dialogues outline the concerns central to her work.

Contents:
Foreword – James Stewart Polshek; Preface – Ruturaj Parikh; Acknowledgements; Introduction – Nandini Somaya Sampat; On India – Arun Shourie and Brinda Somaya; Bhadli village and Vasant Vidyalaya; Campus for Zensar Technologies; The Cathedral & John Connon School; Tata Consultancy Services Headquarters; Working from Mumbai – Kamu Iyer, Mary N. Woods and Brinda Somaya; The Street; The Community; Jubilee Church; Rajabai Clock Tower; Architecture and Culture – Saryu Doshi and Brinda Somaya; St Thomas Cathedral; Nalanda International School; Houses; Club Mahindra Kumbhalgarh; Campus for Goa Institute of Management; The Significance of Brinda Somaya’s Work in Post-Independence India – Jon Lang; Humility and Fierce Resolve: The Making of a Compleat Architect – Porus Olpadwala; The Empathetic Architect – Mary N. Woods; Brinda Somaya’s Practice and Contemporary Architecture in India – Ruturaj Parikh; Epilogue – Tod Williams and Billie Tsien.

Nicknamed ‘the French Borromini’, Gilles Marie Oppenord (1672-1742) was born in Paris, the son of a royal cabinet maker. He was a royal pensioneer at the Academie de France in Rome. There he devoted much of his studies to Mannerist and Baroque architecture and ornament and the Louvre’s carnet (acquired in 1972) is a testament to this period of intense study. Only three sketchbooks of this period survive. When he returned to Paris he was trained as an architect by Jules-Hardouin Mansart and he soon became the architect of Philippe II Duke of Orleans, later Regent of France, for whom he decorated and designed the interiors of the Palais Royal. For the reception of the King in 1723, he was entrusted with the restoration and decoration of the Château de Villers Cotterets. Oppenord also carried out important church commissions, among them the completion of the church of Saint Sulpice in Paris. A talented draughtsman, he published two books of his engraved designs.

Text in French.

New York City’s Cathedral of St. John the Divine has been built stone by stone, story by story for over 125 years. Now collected for the first time in one stunning volume, this oral biography gathers stories behind the still unfinished Cathedral. Over 175 voices, compiled from new interviews and archived material, speak to the fascinating reasons why church and city leaders decided to build the world’s largest Gothic Cathedral, the meaning behind the building’s architecture, and an inside look at some of the world’s most noteworthy events. New photos and freshly unearthed snapshots of the majestic structure punctuate this tome. The words of Bishops and Deans are collected alongside those of Cathedral Artists in Residence Phillipe Petit and Judy Collins, public figures David Dinkins and Al Gore, artists Madeleine L’Engle and Jessye Norman, Cathedral employees, neighborhood residents, and more, illustrating the vibrant life that fills this colossal building.

This book documents the project Radio Carabuco of the Bolivian artist Andrés Pereira Paz, which he created during his residency at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. A podcast (www.radiocarabuco.com) developed in collaboration with international artists, researchers, and activists forms the centerpiece of the project.

Pereira Paz’s critical reflections were inspired by José López de los Ríos’s painting of a vision of hell, commissioned by the Catholic Church during the colonial era. Created in the Andes town of Carabuco in 1664, the work is still on display at the local church. Like many paintings from that period, the Christian motif was brought to Latin America by the Spanish colonial rulers to convert the indigenous population from paganism to Christianity and to peddle propaganda for Catholicism’s message of salvation.

The episodes of Pereira Paz’s podcast investigate the methods and consequences of religious and cultural colonialism and scrutinise various political and societal perspectives, in particular with regard to his native country of Bolivia. The rejection and suppression of everything that is perceived as ‘other’ is a key theme of his work, which also addresses the question of whether the traditional Western idea of ‘hell’ has potentially become a symbolic place of active resistance against propaganda, censorship, and discrimination that should be defended as effectively as possible.

As architecture increasingly became digitized, Heinz Bienefeld (1926-1995) remained analog. Guest editor Wilfried Wang, presents original drawings from 5 projects and conversations visiting them with Bienefeld’s son Nikolaus.

Bienefeld was known to design through a series of drawing scales, starting small and conceptual, then getting client approval at a medium level. Finally, details would be worked out in charcoal at his favorite scale of 1:10, then transferred by pencil and ink. Some of the drawings would be painted, giving the impression of paintings.

These designs were frequently discussed with the craftsmen who would work on the project. Their input led to the construction of special, customized details unique to the structure. He favored building methods that proved long lasting, delivering projects that would serve multiple generations of users.

Text in English and Japanese.

Contents:
Introduction: Heinz Bienefeld – Drawing Collection – Wilfried Wang; Essay: Modern Interpretations of Classical Ideals – Five Buildings by Heinz Bienefeld – Wilfried Wang; Wilhelm Nagel House; Parish Church of St. Willibrord; Parish Church of St. Bonifatius; Heinze-Manke House; Essay: Sketches – Notes on the Four-Year-Long Project for the Heinze-Manke House – Norbert Heinze; Babanek House; Essay: A Silent Master Builder – Hansjörg Göritz; Chronological List of Projects by Heinz Bienefeld.

Impressive monograph of artist Nick Ervinck

Nick Ervinck (b.1981) is an artist primarily interested in the field of tension between nature and culture, between tradition and innovation. In his work, he strives to push the boundaries of digital possibilities, always with respect for (art) historical heritage. Nick Ervinck – Works, GNI_RI_2022 brings together Ervinck’s well-known monumental sculptures and 3D prints, as well as drawings, ceramics and new work in brick and bronze.

Publication accompanying the exhibition Nick Ervinck – GNI_RI_may2022 in St James’ Church in Ghent from 23 May to 24 July 2022.

Includes a text contributed by writer and curator Jon Wood, a specialist in modern and contemporary sculpture, who led the Henry Moore Institute’s research programme for many years. Freddy Decreus, Professor Emeritus at Ghent University, and Michael Hübl also contributed texts.

Text in English and Dutch.

Inspired by poets, draftsmen and printmakers, painters also discovered Haarlem and its beautiful surroundings as rewarding subjects for their work. Jacob van Ruisdael and Gerrit Berckheyde both repeatedly pictured the city – the former with his ‘Haerlempjes’, where heavy cloudy skies dominate the landscape and the unmistakable St Bavo’s Church stands on the horizon. Berckheyde is known for his atmospheric cityscapes: the Grote Markt, with St Bavo’s as the focal point, the Weigh House on the River Spaarne and the city gates.

The definitive photographic guide to discovering the beauty of Rome. A historical-archaeological introduction immerses the visitor in the Eternal City. The 15 itineraries explore the main riches of the historic center of the Urbe, with its fountains, squares, churches, palaces, museums and parks, also include precious gems, far from the traditionally visited routes. Each itinerary features a map, a rich corpus of descriptive images, historical information, curiosities and tips for enjoying an authentic Roman stay.
QR codes at the opening of chapters get to digital contents that enrich the experience of getting to know the Eternal City, from paper to digital.

In Pigments of English Medieval Wall Painting, the author demonstrates that the techniques of wall painting in medieval England were far more complex than had previously been supposed. This is the first systematic analysis of the pigments employed in medieval wall paintings in northern Europe, covering an extensive selection of schemes from a variety of sites including parish churches, cathedrals and abbeys (Canterbury, Westminster, Norwich, Winchester, St Albans, Sherborne and Durham). The nature and extent of the palette used is revealed as well as the sophistication with which pigments were applied to achieve differing effects. Thirty pigments are detected including four previously unknown in the context of English medieval wall paintings – vivianite, salt green, kermes lake and madder lake. Also discovered are three alterations of pigments: the lightening of red lead; alteration of vivianite to a yellow form and the transformation of verdigris to a blue chloride-based alteration product. The use of different binding media employed for particular pigments in a single paint layer demonstrates the complex manner in which paintings were executed. The findings, discussed in the context of wall painting, sculptural polychromy and panel painting techniques in medieval northern Europe, show the broad chronological development in the choice, fabrication and application of materials linked to changes in artistic intent, technology and workshop practice. Beautifully illustrated with more than 200 color plates, Pigments of English Medieval Wall Painting has significant implications for the conservation methods of such paintings and is an important source of information for all those interested in pigments and paintings.

With a penchant for painting and an appreciation for the well-designed home since he was a child, Gary McBournie has perfected the art of creating interior spaces with an impeccable eye for color. He established his design firm in Boston in 1993 and has since created warm, elegant, and timeless classic American homes, always with a twist on tradition. Finely attuned to his environment, McBournie develops each interior with a color palette that matches its surrounding exterior, splashing cool and restful hues for a cottage in New England, shades of lime and papaya in the tropics, and warm sunset tones for a ski house in Montana. Featuring personal photographs and the inspirations behind his color choices, Living Color is a must-have for anyone looking to be tickled pink by gorgeous, twenty-first-century renditions of the comfortably chic American home. Contents: Introduction; Cityscape; Rich Reds and Browns for a New York Loft Spring: Cool and Restful Hues for a Cottage; A Soft and Romantic Palette in Palm Beach; Accents of Yellow and Orange for a Range of Blues; Butter-Yellow Walls, Pale Colors, and Jewel-Toned Trims Summer: Yellows, Reds, and Pinks for a Southern Locale; Bougainvillea, Lime, and Papaya for the Tropics; Crisp Blues, Sharp Whites, and Stripes; Classic Blue and White for a Sailor’s Retreat; Saturated Colors and Vibrant Prints Autumn: A Dramatic Pied-a-Terre in Orange and Brown; Fall Colors for a Well-Patinated Patchwork; Deep Tones of Silks, Mohairs, and Cashmeres; Winter: Subtle Oranges and Reds of a Sunset Sky; Grandeur Defined by a Soft Palette and Floral Chintz; Pale, Leafy Greens and Earthy Browns for a City Loft
·Featuring stunning photographs of the unique, colorful, and inspired interiors of Gary McBournie
·Discover the never-before-seen inspirations behind McBournie’s designs

With a penchant for painting and an appreciation for the well-designed home since he was a child, Gary McBournie has perfected the art of creating interior spaces with an impeccable eye for color. He established his design firm in Boston in 1993 and has since created warm, elegant, and timeless classic American homes, always with a twist on tradition. Finely attuned to his environment, McBournie develops each interior with a color palette that matches its surrounding exterior, splashing cool and restful hues for a cottage in New England, shades of lime and papaya in the tropics, and warm sunset tones for a ski house in Montana. Featuring personal photographs and the inspirations behind his color choices, Living Color is a must-have for anyone looking to be tickled pink by gorgeous, twenty-first-century renditions of the comfortably chic American home.

Contents:
Introduction; Cityscape; Rich Reds and Browns for a New York Loft
Spring: Cool and Restful Hues for a Cottage; A Soft and Romantic Palette in Palm Beach; Accents of Yellow and Orange for a Range of Blues; Butter-Yellow Walls, Pale Colors, and Jewel-Toned Trims
Summer: Yellows, Reds, and Pinks for a Southern Locale; Bougainvillea, Lime, and Papaya for the Tropics; Crisp Blues, Sharp Whites, and Stripes; Classic Blue and White for a Sailor’s Retreat; Saturated Colors and Vibrant Prints
Autumn: A Dramatic Pied-a-Terre in Orange and Brown; Fall Colors for a Well-Patinated Patchwork; Deep Tones of Silks, Mohairs, and Cashmeres;
Winter: Subtle Oranges and Reds of a Sunset Sky; Grandeur Defined by a Soft Palette and Floral Chintz; Pale, Leafy Greens and Earthy Browns for a City Loft

This highly anticipated monograph focuses on the architectural output of Enrique Browne, a talented and prolific Chilean architect and co-founder of Browne & Swett Arquitectos, based in Santiago. Over the last 40 years, this South American architect has been trying to reconcile natural and artificial worlds through architecture. They are one indissoluble unity. This book showcases in rich photographic detail how his innovative projects incorporate multiple environmental aspects that result in a complex, layered response to the challenges of place, form and identity in Chile.

Browne’s practice has developed architectural designs in a diverse range of scales, with emphasis on sustainability and energy efficiency. This volume delves into Browne’s processes, such as developing variations of the “grapevinestructure typology” to create a “double green skin” as a green wall (or roof), to protect dwellings from the region’s strong westerly sun; or combining vegetation and its oxygenation benefits with building to counter pollution; or using both artificial and natural light as a material for illuminating spaces or volume. This book also includes commentary on the new zeitgeist surrounding modernity and the impacts of the digital and globalized world on architecture today. Highly regarded, and a prolific writer and designer, Enrique Browne has a unique way of looking at the world. Showcasing the wide range of his design, this title is sure to impress.

Peter Siemssen, a creative businessman, is the driving force behind this entirely personal publication – a book inspired by his profound knowledge of the subject as well as his passion. Siemssen presents a selection of works from his important ceramic collection against a backdrop of decades of experience and encounters with the most important contemporary ceramicists. Arranged geographically, the book presents Japanese, German, Scandinavian, Western European, North American and Mediterranean ceramics in a broad range of significant works. The high point is the work of Gilbert Portanier, with whom Peter Siemssen has had particularly close artistic contacts and ties of friendship. Documentary photographs faithfully reproducing the works lead into interpretative texts, artist biographies and Peter Siemssen’s entertaining reminiscences to provide access to art ceramics in the latter half of the 20th century. Distinguished specialists in the field contribute essays on various aspects of the subject.
A selection of the artists include; Gilbert Portanier (France), Karin Bablok (Germany), Hans-Theo Baumann (Germany), Antje Brüggemann-Breckwoldt (Germany), Nino Caruso (Italy), Antoni Cumella (Spain), Elisabeth Fritsch (England), Dorothy Hafner (USA), Shoji Hamada (Japan), Bernhard Leach (England), Stig Lindberg (Sweden), Sonngard Marcks (Germany), Renée Reichenbach (Germany), Lucie Rie (England), Ursula and Karl Scheid (Germany), Tatsuzo Shimaoka (Japan), and Björn Wiinblad (Denmark).
The ‘Garden of England’, ’The High Weald’, these are phrases that describe a 70-year-old Area of Outstanding National Beauty in Southern England. Among these dramatic landscapes and ancient woodlands stand many castles, mansions and cottages, ringed with orchards, meadows, drifting flowers and horticultural exotica. Featured gardens range from grand landscapes to works of glorious eccentricity, Arts and Crafts green rooms to postage stamp-sized plots of ingenuity. Wilderness weaves into floral genius, while native and exotic species stand side-by-side – all within the unique climate of the English garden.
Including chapters on English Parks, Arts and Crafts Gardens and Woodland Gardens, Where the Wildness Pleases – The English Garden Celebrated pays homage to English horticultural excellence and tells the gripping stories behind some of our most breath-taking landscapes. This book also features a handy Who’s Who of designers, gardeners, plant hunters and nurserymen, and a brief guide to English playing greens – cricket, bowling, croquet and tennis.
This is a welcome guide for anyone interested in visiting this astonishingly beautiful part of the country, or those thinking of buying a plot.

In 1751, John Holker (1719-1786), an English textile manufacturer exiled in France, undertook an industrial espionage mission to England to collect samples of English textiles on behalf of the French king, Louis XV. On his return, the samples were assembled in a manuscript volume, which is now preserved at the Museum of Decorative Arts in Paris. Each sample in this album is accompanied by a handwritten technical description specifying the quality of the fabric, its price, its dimensions and the manufacturing processes. This album is famous for preserving the oldest identifiable samples of jean fabric.

Completely bilingual, the book includes a facsimile reproduction of the album, accompanied by a transcription of its handwritten text and a dozen essays. The essays, written by academics, curators and specialists from France, Britain and North America, explore the album from various angles: the globalization of commerce, the slave trade, industrial espionage, economic rivalry between France and England, the taste for cotton and its role in the history of fashion, etc. The book demonstrates the importance of centuries-old links between France and the United Kingdom and is an indispensable work of reference for the history of textiles.

Text in English and French.

‘In England, I’d become too well-known as a Tatler photographer. It was wonderful to be invisible again.’

At the end of the 1980s, society photographer Dafydd Jones began a new life in New York. He had been hired by Vanity Fair to attend the most talked-about parties in the city and soon found himself descending into a world of human tableaux, ladies who lunch, princesses in powder rooms and dachshunds scrapping over canapés. Camera at the ready, Jones quickly filled the society pages of the illustrious magazine, snapping the likes of Leona Helmsley, Donald Trump, Jeffrey Epstein, Ghislaine Maxwell and Imelda Marcos as they celebrated, mourned and unravelled in the bright lights. During the day, he captured the city streets and the ordinary citizens grounded in the real world. In these pages, the author of England: The Last Hurrah reveals the story of New York, the highs and the lows, as the ’90s unfolded in front of his expert lens. 

‘Mr. Jones goes about his business with cheery zest and a wicked eye.’ – New York Times, 1993

The Classicist is an annual journal dedicated to the classical tradition in architecture and the allied arts. Focused on New England, the Classicist No. 20 explores the region’s rich architectural history; contemporary examples of classical design through professional and student portfolios; and academic articles authored by leaders within the field. Contributors include Michael J. Lewis, Professor at Williams College and architecture critic for the Wall Street Journal; Kenneth Hafertepe, Professor at Baylor University; Aaron M. Helfand, Architect at Knight Architecture in New Haven; Sarah Allaback, author and architectural historian; Mark Alan Hewitt, architect, preservationist, and architectural historian; Keith N. Morgan, architectural historian and Professor Emeritus at Boston University; Kyle Dugdale, architect, historian, and Senior Critic at Yale University; and John Tittmann, founding partner at Albert Righter Tittman Architects, alongside submissions to the professional and academic portfolio.

Liverpool’s unique history as an international port and a cultural melting pot has given it a character all its own. The city has produced music that conquered the world and is home to more historic buildings than any other British metropolis outside London. It features two magnificent cathedrals and many world famous museums. But beyond its renowned exterior, is an eclectic assortment of places hidden and unknown.
This deliciously offbeat guidebook will lead you to a different Liverpool: down tunnels, up skyscrapers, and into secret bars, speciality shops, and disused factories. You will see Balenciaga trainers and vintage planes, rolling bridges and disappearing statues, Liver birds and celebrity suitcases, home-baked cakes and cast-iron churches.
Stroll under the palms in a magical glasshouse, explore a 1950s kitchen or a museum of false teeth. Relax in a hip tea bar with over 50 varieties of tea (loose leaf naturally). Marvel at the world’s most expensive book or largest brick building (27 million bricks!). Go underground to explore a network of mysterious tunnels or a perfectly preserved World War II bunker. Drink in a prison cell, picnic in a graveyard, or stay in the hotel where Winston Churchill and Bob Dylan were guests.
Think you know Liverpool? Think again! Whether you’re a long-time local, a first-time tourist, or a repeat visitor, prepare to be charmed and intrigued by 111 eccentric and unusual spots you’d never expect to find in the city best known for football and the Fab Four.